William Hague: Chairman of the Royal United Services Institute

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(London Post)  William Hague will become chairman of RUSI on 1 September, taking over from Lord Hutton of Furness who served in this role since 2010.

Welcoming him to RUSI Director-General, Professor Michael Clarke said:

‘The Rt Hon William Hague is the most ideal choice chairman to succeed Lord Hutton in this role. His experience at the very top of UK politics since 1997 is unrivalled and his status as a global figure is exactly right for the next phase of RUSI’s development. He is a most worthy successor for chairman to Lord Hutton and I’m greatly looking forward to working with him from September this year – not least on RUSI’s involvement in the next Strategic Defence and Security Review and all the challenges and opportunities in UK external policy. In global political terms, this is a difficult time to be a political leader, but a wonderful time to be an analyst. Mr Hague has been both and his experience is gold dust to an institute such as this.’

William Hague said:

‘I am very pleased to join RUSI as their new Chairman from September. They have an exceptional record for producing outstanding research and analysis across a diverse range of issues. At a time when we face an increasingly complex and unstable world, we need ever greater insight and scrutiny into the challenges confronting our global security and defence. I look forward to working with Director-General Michael Clarke, who has led the organisation so impressively, and his outstanding team of analysts, at a time of exciting prospects for RUSI.’

The Rt Hon William Hague served as Member of Parliament for Richmond (Yorkshire) from 1989 to 2015. He first entered the Cabinet in 1995, and led the Conservative Party from 1997 to 2001.  From 2010 to 2014 he served as Foreign Secretary and between 2014 and 2015 he was Leader of the House of Commons.

Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) is an independent think-tank for defence and security. RUSI is a unique institution; founded in 1831 by the Duke of Wellington, it embodies nearly two centuries of forward thinking, free discussion and careful reflection on defence and security matters.

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