Kenya Mourns Victims of al-Shabab University Massacre

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Thursday’s attack, in the northeastern town of Garissa, close to the Somalia border, left 142 students, three police officers and three soldiers dead. Kenya has begun three days of national mourning for the 148 victims of the extremist organization al-Shabab last Thursday. The country’s Easter Sunday prayer service will be held to remember those who died in the attack on Garissa University, and the government announced that flags will fly at half-mast. Thursday’s attack, in the northeastern town of Garissa, close to the Somalia border, left 142 students, three police officers and three soldiers dead. Survivors said armed men stormed shot indiscriminately into campus dorms. Survivors were taken to a stadium in Nairobi, which has been turned into a disaster center where relatives can trace their loved ones. Thursday’s attack was the deadliest since the 1998 bombing of the U.S. embassy in the capital Nairobi, which killed more than 200 people. President Uhuru Kenyatta has described the actions as an “attack on humanity” and vowed to take harsh measures against the terrorists. “My administration shall respond in the severest way possible to the attack and any other attack,” Kenyatta said in a televised speech. Al-Shabaab, an armed group based in Somalia with connections to al-Qaida, has an estimated troop strength of up to 9,000. UPDATE: The son of a Kenyan government official has been arrested in connection to the massacre. According to the interior ministry, Abdirahim Abdullahi is suspected of being one of the four gunmen. According to news website Kenya Today, Abdullahi is a law graduate, and the son of a regional chief in Kenya’s Mandera country. He is now accused of being a member of Al Shabaab, which has threatened to carry out more attacks on Kenyan soil
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