India ‘pooed’ in Space by destroying old satellite – NASA

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By Dr Shahid Qureshi: –

The recent Indian test of destroying an obsolete satellite in space created ‘mess’ in the space that would take decades to clear off or burn. It is like taking Prime Minister Modi’s open air ‘defecating’ program to space called ‘take poo to the loo’. The head of NASA on 1st April 2019, branded India’s destruction of one of its satellites a “terrible thing” that had created 400 pieces of orbital debris and led to new dangers for astronauts aboard the International Space Station. This Indian mentality of making ‘mess’ starts every morning when over 500 million Indians sits on both sides of railway tracks to ‘defecate’ in the open and cause environmental hazard, disease and water borne diseases.  An average BMI of an Indian is equal a very poor African country according to Channel 4 Documentary.

Jim Bridenstine was addressing employees of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration five days after India shot down a low-orbiting satellite in a missile test to prove it was among the world’s advanced space powers.

Not all of the pieces were big enough to track, Bridenstine explained. “What we are tracking right now, objects big enough to track — we’re talking about 10 centimeters (six inches) or bigger — about 60 pieces have been tracked.”

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The Indian satellite was destroyed at a relatively low altitude of 180 miles (300 kilometers), well below the ISS and most satellites in orbit.

But 24 of the pieces “are going above the apogee of the International Space Station,” said Bridenstine.

“That is a terrible, terrible thing to create an event that sends debris at an apogee that goes above the International Space Station,” he continued, adding: “That kind of activity is not compatible with the future of human spaceflight.”

 

“It’s unacceptable and NASA needs to be very clear about what its impact to us is.”

The U.S. military tracks objects in space to predict the collision risk for the ISS and for satellites. They are currently tracking 23,000 objects larger than 10 centimeters.

That includes about 10,000 pieces of space debris, of which nearly 3,000 were created by a single event: a Chinese anti-satellite test in 2007 at 530 miles from the surface.

As a result of the Indian test, the risk of collision with the ISS has increased by 44 percent over 10 days, Bridenstine said.

But the risk will dissipate over time as much of the debris will burn up as it enters the atmosphere.

In a televised address to the nation last week, Modi said “India has entered its name as an elite space power. An anti-satellite weapon successfully targeted a live satellite on a low-earth orbit.”

He said Mission Shakti (power) was completed in three minutes.

The announcement came ahead of the country’s general election, which will be held in seven stages starting on April 11.

(Dr Shahid Qureshi is senior analyst with BBC and chief editor of The London Post. He writes on security, terrorism and foreign policy. He also appears as analyst on Al-Jazeera, Press TV, MBC, Kazak TV (Kazakhstan), LBC Radio London. He was also international election observer for Azerbaijan April 2018, Kazakhstan 2015 and 2016 and Pakistan 2002. He has written a famous book “War on Terror and Siege of Pakistan” published in 2009. At Government College Lahore he wrote his MA thesis on ‘Political Thought of Imam Khomeini’ and visited Tehran University. He is PhD in ‘Political Psychology’ and studied Law at a British University. He also speaks at Cambridge University. He is a visiting Professor at Hebe University in China.)

Views expressed are not of The London Pot

 

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