European law should include ‘Islamophobia’, Turkish FM

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Foreign Minister of Turkey Mevlut Cavusoglu speaks at a panel discussion of new 2017 European Islamophobia Report (EIR) by the Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research (SETA) unveiled, in Ankara, Turkey on April 11, 2018. (Cem Özdel /AA)

Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said populist politicians in Europe, especially in Germany, used anti-Turkey discourse and Islamophobia to win elections.

The Turkish foreign minister on Wednesday urged European countries to include Islamophobia as a crime in their constitution, without waiting for a Holocaust-like situation to unfold.

“We should ensure that Islamophobia is included in the [European] constitution as a crime clearly,” Mevlut Cavusoglu said during an event at capital Ankara marked to unveil the latest European Islamophobia Report (EIR).

“There is no need to relive Auschwitz or wait for Muslims to be burned in gas chambers like Jewish people,” he said, referring to the Nazi concentration camp in Poland and the Holocaust.

Cavusoglu said hate speech, which is a crime in Europe, is still used by politicians.

He said populist politicians in Europe, especially in Germany, used anti-Turkey discourse and Islamophobia to win elections.

The EU’s largest economy has witnessed growing Islamophobia and hatred of migrants in recent years, triggered by propaganda from far-right and populist parties who exploit fears over the refugee crisis and terrorism.

The far-right AfD became the third-largest party in Germany’s federal parliament after winning 12.6 percent of the vote in federal elections last year.

Not restricted to politicians

Cavusoglu said that Islamophobia is not restricted to politicians but also extends to civilians and the media.

“There is another problem: the press in Europe. Today, we are unfortunately seeing that the European press is also joining or sinking into the populist flow,” he said.

“When we observe the language used by the media, hostility towards migrants and foreigners, and Islamophobia is obvious.”

He criticised European politicians for their lack of action against rising incidents of Islamophobic assaults.

“Europe does not regard Islamophobia as a hate crime and it is not seen as another form of racism, especially by the politicians,” he said.

Islamic houses of worship across Europe have endured dozens of attacks over the past three months as attackers attempted to set them afire with Molotov cocktails or spray-painted terror symbols or racist slurs on the walls. Luckily, the attacks caused no casualties.

Germany takes the lead in hate crimes against mosques, as over 30 of them were targeted in such attacks in the first three months of this year — double the figure in the same period last year.

Rising wave of Islamophobia

Ten out of 31 attacks were perpetrated by far-right groups, while the remaining 21 assaults were conducted by YPG/PKK supporters as the group threatened to carry out violent acts against a Turkish counterterrorism operation in Afrin, northwestern Syria.

Cavusoglu said non-existing ideologies such as “Islamism” are also repeated by European politicians and the media which lead to false perceptions of Islam.

“There is only one Islam, and its meaning is peace,“ he said.

According to the European Islamophobia Report 2017, a rising wave of Islamophobia has taken hold in Europe.

The report revealed 908 crimes, ranging from verbal and physical attacks to murder attempts, targeting Muslims in Germany, as well as 664 in Poland, 364 in the Netherlands, 256 in Austria, 121 in France, 56 in Denmark and 36 in Belgium.

The report was prepared by the Ankara-based Foundation for Political, Economic and Social Research (SETA).

Source: AA
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